Category Archives: computers

Making copies

One of my early goals this year has been to revamp the backup regime at the old homestead. Previously, I have relied on rotating external drives connected to my main desktop, and putting most content on a samba share that also got backed up. But it was a bit ad-hoc and things not on the share only got backed up sporadically. I’d rather not use a cloud backup service because reasons, so I bought a NAS, and now it looks like this:

  • Daily:
    • download cloud assets (google photo)
    • backup all disks to NAS (borg backup on Linux, Windows backup). Incrementals of 7 days / 4 weeks / 6 months
    • backup NAS to external drive (rsync)
  • Weekly:
    • borg check the latest backup
    • swap external disk with one in fire safe
  • Monthly:
    • swap external disk with off-site disk

I think this should work well enough until I use up enough storage to outstrip the individual external disks, then I’ll have to rethink things. Too far, or not too far enough?

Router redux

I had just a little bit of downtime over the last few weeks while Angeline and I reacquainted ourselves with how to take care of an infant. It’s like riding a bicycle: there are tons of things you forgot since last time.

One of the long-on-my-todo-list items finally got completed: I upgraded all of my wifi routers. I have 5: an old dual band 11n router and four TP-Link 11ac units, all of which were running some oldish build of OpenWRT.

I decided the 11n router’s time has come for the trash-heap, so I put the latest stable LEDE build on one of the TP-Links and swapped it out.

The other three are just access points without the router: they just have all the ports on the unit bridged together, connected to the router via a wired switch. I also have a mesh wifi interface up on each unit so that I could place the unit anywhere regardless of wired connectivity (though, in practice, I have wired drops everywhere so I don’t really use this.) For these, I build from source with just the required bits. I added a serial port to one of the units so I can test builds there before rolling out to the other two.

In all it was pretty painless since the LEDE build is more or less the same as OpenWRT. I did go through (LEDE) recovery once and found this fun issue:

root@(none):/tmp# sysupgrade -n lede-ar71xx-generic-archer-c7-v2-squashfs-sysupgrade.bin
Image metadata not found
killall: watchdog: no process killed
Commencing upgrade. All shell sessions will be closed now.
Failed to connect to ubus
root@(none):/tmp#

…because sysupgrade has different paths for failsafe vs not; and for some reason $FAILSAFE is not always set. Do this to work-around:

root@(none):/tmp# export FAILSAFE=1
root@(none):/tmp# sysupgrade -n lede-ar71xx-generic-archer-c7-v2-squashfs-sysupgrade.bin
Image metadata not found
killall: watchdog: no process killed
Commencing upgrade. All shell sessions will be closed now.
root@(none):/tmp# Connection to 192.168.1.1 closed by remote host.

React reaction

An embarrassing admission to make: I wrote something in javascript.[1]

Actually, I wrote it in React, because I still think of javascript as that awful language that works differently in every browser, and so, you know, to stay relevant, I decided to learn the framework that web developers everywhere have already cast into yesterday’s wastebin for the new shiny. This, pretty much.[2]

Anyway, I replaced the third-party crossword app on my website with my own NIH version and made it somewhat responsive [3] so that it works on my phone. Also there are two new-ish puzzles since the last time I posted, dated 2016-11-25 and 2016-12-30. Each of them has its own set of problems, but I think I am at least learning where I need to improve.

To this neophyte, my impression is that using React (and ES6) is much nicer than that terrible language that they compile down to. On the other hand, the pattern of moving state up the object hierarchy away from an object’s view feels backwards and not very OO-like. Perhaps if I also used Flux then I might get enlightened on this point, but that is for another day.

[1] Here’s a nickel, kid. Buy yourself a real language.
[2] The day that my relevance depends on knowing the latest JS framework is the day that I will take up a completely different career.
[3] Anything worth doing is worth doing somewhat.

Encrypted mesh PSA

I’m a bit late writing this up, as lately wifi stuff has taken a back seat to the day job. But, I’ve now seen the following issue reported more than once, so hopefully this post will save the other two mesh users some grief.

If you are running an encrypted mesh on wpa_supplicant or (ye gods) authsae, take note:

  • Encrypted mesh on kernel 4.8 will not interoperate with kernel < 4.8
  • wpa_supplicant 2.6 will not interoperate with 2.5
  • authsae as of commit 706a2cf will not interoperate with that of commit 813ec0e [1]
  • wpa_supplicant 2.6 and authsae commit 706a2cf require additional configuration to work with kernel < 4.8 (see below).

What is behind all of that? A while ago I noticed and mentioned to another networking developer that the 802.11 standard calls for certain group-addressed management frames in mesh networks to be encrypted with the mesh group key (MGTK). However, the implementation in the kernel only integrity-protected these frames, using the integrity group key (IGTK) [2]. I don’t happen to know the history here: it may be that this was something that was changed between the draft and the standard, but anyway that was the state until Masashi Honma fixed it, with patch 46f6b06050b that landed in kernel 4.8.

Meanwhile, Jouni Malinen fixed a bunch of related issues in the wpa_supplicant implementation, namely that IGTK was not being generated properly and instead the MGTK was used for that. I made the same kind of fixes for authsae.

Yes, it’s a multiple(!) flag day and we suck for that.

Now, on to how to fix your mesh.

Old mesh daemon + old kernel everywhere should still work.
Old mesh daemon + new kernel everywhere should still work.
New mesh daemon + new kernel everywhere should still work.

New mesh daemon + pre-4.8 kernel: you will most likely see that peering works but no data goes across because HWMP frames are dropped at the peer. The solution here is to enable PMF in the mesh daemon:

  • add “pmf=2″ or “ieee80211w=2″ to the relevant section of wpa_supplicant.conf
  • add “pmf=1;” to the meshd section of authsae.cfg

If you for some reason find yourself in the position of needing to run a mix of old/new wpa_s and/or old/new kernel, here are my (completely untested) suggestions:

  • patch the kernel to accept PMF-protected frames as well as encrypted frames (this allows older kernels to work with newer ones)
  • patch the new mesh daemon (wpa_supplicant or authsae) to copy the MGTK into the IGTK instead of generating a separate key (this allows older mesh daemon to work with the newer one since older daemon will use MGTK for IGTK).

Both of these will reduce your security and don’t follow the spec, so there’s little chance such changes will go upstream.

[1] Prior to 706a2cf, authsae doesn’t even interoperate with wpa_supplicant due to not filling in all of the elements in peering frames. My advice would be to switch to wpa_supplicant, which has things like a maintainer and a test suite.
[2] On encryption vs integrity protection: the latter is similar to PGP-signing of emails: it makes tampering evident but does not hide the content of the message itself.

Fake clicky

In the previous installment I had opined about the untapped power inside my new mechanical keyboard. I haven’t had much time to continue looking into the firmware, but I did find the original source of the firmware tools for a similar product. His blog post is well worth a read.

Thus far the new device is performing admirably, but it did come with an unforeseen problem.

I always have a bunch of computers here at my desk, and so for some time I’ve had a physical KVM switch to share a single monitor and input devices among them. This switch has a special USB port on the back just for the keyboard, which it monitors for the double-scroll-lock macro command to switch the display. Unfortunately, said port will not power the new keyboard and also won’t work with a hub.

So, this happened:

Sad 2-keyboard desktop

One for switching, one for typing.

Inspired a bit by Johannes Berg’s (more interesting) uSynergy HID project, I thought I’d see if I could bang up a “keyboard” that just lets me put the minimal bits on the wire to make the KVM happy. I had a Dragonboard (Arm64 SBC) already sitting around, and it supports OTG out of the box. Linaro publishes nightly Debian snapshots for it so getting the device up and running with Linux userland is painless.

The only real work involved is to build a new kernel with the USB HID function drivers. Pretty standard fare except the 96boards wiki is somewhat confusing as to where to get all the pieces; here are my unedited notes:

Initrd: http://builds.96boards.org/snapshots/dragonboard410c/linaro/debian/latest/initrd.img-*
Toolchain: http://releases.linaro.org/14.11/components/toolchain/binaries/aarch64-linux-gnu/gcc-linaro-4.9-2014.11-x86_64_aarch64-linux-gnu.tar.xz
skales: git clone git://codeaurora.org/quic/kernel/skales
Linux repo: https://github.com/rsalveti/linux.git
Branch: qcomlt-4.4
defconfig: distro.config

export ARCH=arm64
export CROSS_COMPILE=~/ext/dragonboard/gcc-linaro-4.9-2014.11-x86_64_aarch64-linux-gnu/bin/aarch64-linux-gnu-
make defconfig distro.config
make -j8 Image dtbs
make modules modules_install INSTALL_MOD_PATH=../dragonboard

../skales/dtbTool -o dt.img -s 2048 arch/arm64/boot/dts/qcom/
../skales/mkbootimg --kernel arch/arm64/boot/Image \
  --ramdisk initrd.img \
  --output boot-db410c.img \
  --dt dt.img \
  --pagesize 2048 \
  --base 0x80000000 \
  --cmdline "root=/dev/disk/by-partlabel/rootfs rw rootwait console=ttyMSM0,115200n8"

* rsync modules to rootfs
* fastboot to boot or flash the kernel

With the kernel built and booted, I copied this setup mostly verbatim to get a functioning HID device.

And then the only “code” needed is a little shell script to send my switching sequence:

#!/bin/bash
function send_keycode {
	echo "keycode: $1"
	local keycode=$1
	echo -ne "\x00\x00"$keycode"\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00" > /dev/hidg0
	echo -ne "\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00" > /dev/hidg0
	sleep .1
}

function num_keycode {
	local num=$1
	local ord=$(printf "%d" \'$1)
	let kval=$(($ord - 49 + 30))
	char=\\x$(printf "%x" $kval)
	echo $char
}

cd $(basename $(dirname $0))
visible=$(cat .switch.cur || echo "1")
case $1 in
	--up) screen=$(( (visible + 1) % 4)) ;;
	--down) screen=$(( (visible + 4 - 1) % 4)) ;;
	[1234]) screen=$(( $1 - 1 ));;
	*) echo "Usage: $0 [--up|--down|[1-4]]"; exit 1 ;;
esac

echo Switching to screen $(( screen + 1 ))
echo $screen > .switch.cur

# send: 2 x scroll lock, [1-4], enter
send_keycode "\x47"
send_keycode "\x47"
send_keycode $(num_keycode $((screen + 1)) )
send_keycode "\x28"

The volume buttons on the Dragonboard still work when the device is in OTG mode, so I used xbindkeys to bind volume up to “switch.sh –up” and likewise for down.

Happy 2-keyboard desktop

Much better.

Yes, this is pretty ridiculously overpowered for what it is, and I’ll probably replace this with an MCU build when I get some time, but still it is fun to think about having a keyboard that runs X.

Clicky

I got a new keyboard this week with 80s-era clickiness: a Cooler Master QFR XTi.

This thing has LED-backlit keys, which is kind of fun but also a bit of a gimmick. More interesting to me is that driving everything is an ARM Cortex M3 MCU (Holtek HT32F165x) which is flashable over USB. That is more powerful than my first computer.

It would be nice to expand the features of this thing a bit, e.g. there’s an RTC on board the MCU, wouldn’t it be useful to have TOTP built directly into the keyboard? Or, perhaps it would be useful to audit the vendor firmware to make certain it is not recording your keystrokes. Of course, getting to the point of unraveling the vendor FW and flashing one’s own will entail a fair amount of work.

It seems there is support for SWD programming and pads for that on the motherboard, but given my clunkiness with a soldering iron that is kind of a last-resort thing to revisit once I brick my keyboard.

Anyway, I captured the firmware upload via USBPcap in Windows. Turns out it’s a fairly simple protocol. I saw the following two messages cross the wire:

MSG 1:

01 01 53 b6 38 2d 00 00 6b 2d 00 00 73 2d 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 73 2d 00 00 07 48 80 47 07 48 80 47
07 48 00 47 fe e7 fe e7 fe e7 fe e7 fe e7 fe e7

MSG 2:

01 01 84 0d 6c 2d 00 00 9f 2d 00 00 fe e7 fe e7
fe e7 fe e7 ad 7b 00 00 4d 71 00 00 81 2d 00 00
df f8 0c d0 00 f0 3e f8 00 48 00 47 e5 84 00 00
60 47 00 20 06 49 07 4a 08 68 50 43 43 f2 39 02

It is reasonable to assume that the “fe e7″ chain repeats without a break across the two messages, which in turn tells us that the header for the message is twelve bytes:

    msg 1: 01 01 53 b6 38 2d 00 00 6b 2d 00 00
    msg 2: 01 01 84 0d 6c 2d 00 00 9f 2d 00 00

Bytes 4-8 and 8-12 look like addresses in little endian format. As it happens, if you subtract these two addresses and add one, you get the value 52, which is exactly how many post-header bytes are in the message. Also note that the “address 1″ in message two is just one more than the “address 2″ in message one. So we have something that looks like this:

    struct hdr {
        u8 cmd;                         /* ??? */
        u8 subcmd;                      /* ??? */
        __le16 something;               /* ??? -- crc? */
        __le32 start_dest_address;      /* first byte of xfer */
        __le32 end_dest_address;        /* last byte (inclusive) */
        u8 data[0];
    };

The device presumably copies the payload from “data” into the physical (flash) addresses specified in the header.

So I dumped the firmware from the pcap file. There’s nothing like an ELF header on it, but I guess that’s probably normal for bare-metal programs running on an MCU. Various bits do look like ARM thumb code.

Until now I didn’t really know squat about ARM MCUs, but a little bit of googling indicates that E7 FE is an infinite loop and the typical way you would write a handler for something like NMI that you just want to go into loop mode. So that explains the 0xfee7 sequence, and everything before looks like a lot of little-endian 32 bit addresses, which lines up with what would go in the Vector Table, an ARM concept which contains the values for program counter load address, stack pointer, IRQ handlers, and so on.

A bit more googling found some github projects with functional flashing utilities for similar products with similar or the same flashing protocol. There is yet hope, hopefully more to come.

On Drawing Squares

I’ve been looking at the sample drawing in speccy to try and speed it up. For a given frame, it renders about 10000 points as 9-pixel anti-aliased squares using Cairo, in Python. On my desktop (Debian stable, Nouveau driver) it gets a pokey 1 FPS.

My graphics knowledge is about 20 years old at this point, and while I did once know various arcane tricks on the hardware of the day, none of that is relevant now. So I know basically nothing about modern graphics. It is still not clear to me to what extent the 2D primitives use acceleration, and it doesn’t help much that, in as many years that I’ve been asleep on this topic, there seems to have been as many new APIs introduced and retired: today there are at least XRender, XAA, EXA, UXA, SNA, and Glamor — did I miss any?

Anyway, here are the results on my desktop from things that I’ve tried so far [1]:

test                    FPS
----                    -------
orig (aa)                0.904780
no_aa                    1.103061
no_cairo                 8.372354
no_cairo_aa              2.408143
batched                 19.873722
batched_aa              29.045358
batched_by_color         7.611148
batched_by_color_aa     14.856336

The tests are:

  • orig: the current code, where each rectangle is filled immediately in turn.
  • no_cairo: I skip Cairo completely and manually render to a GdkPixbuf internally, under the theory that draw function call overhead is the big killer
  • batched: using Cairo with one cr.fill() call for all of the rectangles. This means all are rendered with the same color, and as such could not actually be used. But it is interesting as a data point on batching vs. not.
  • batched_by_color: one cr.fill() call per distinct color
  • aa refers to having antialiasing enabled

Batching appears to make a huge difference, and binning and batching by color is the most performant usable setup. It’s not really difficult to batch by color since the colors are internally just an 8-bit intensity value, though in my quick test I am hashing the string representation of the float triples so it’s not as quick as it could be.

I don’t understand the performance increase on batching with AA applied. Perhaps this is an area where some sort of acceleration is disabled when AA is also disabled? This is a repeatable outcome on this hardware / driver.

Then I tested on my laptop and got these numbers (Debian Testing, Intel graphics):

test                    FPS
----                    -------
orig (aa)               28.554757
no_aa                   27.632071
no_cairo                 9.954314
no_cairo_aa              2.958732
batched                 43.917732
batched_aa              28.750845
batched_by_color        19.933492
batched_by_color_aa     19.803839

Here, just using Cairo is the best. My guess is batching by color is only worse because of the higher CPU cost of the hashing and the rather inefficient way I did it. Given the close performance of batched_aa and the original test though, batching done well probably isn’t going to make much difference.

Finally, I went back to the desktop and tried Nvidia binary drivers (oh, how I don’t miss those).

test                    FPS
----                    -------
orig                     6.586327
no_aa                   15.216683
no_cairo                 9.072748
no_cairo_aa              2.368938
batched                 39.192580
batched_aa              27.717076
batched_by_color        18.681605
batched_by_color_aa     16.450811

It seems Nouveau still has some tricks to learn. In this case AA is, as expected, slower than non-AA. Overall, batching still seems to give a decent speedup on this hardware, so I may look into actually doing that. Moral of the story: use the laptop.

As for speccy, I actually had a use for it recently: I needed to see whether a particular testmode on ath5k was functional. Although I can’t really measure anything precisely with the tool, I can at least see if the spectrum looks close enough. Below is a snapshot from my testing, showing that in this testmode, the device emits power on 2412 MHz with a much narrower bandwidth than normal.

This matches, as far as I can tell, the spectrum shown on the NDA-encumbered datasheet.

[1] Approaches not tried yet: reducing the point count by partial redraws, using something like VBOs in GL, or rewriting parts in C. Feel free to let me know of others.

memory µ-optimizing

While looking at some kmalloc statistics for my little corner of wireless, I found a new tool for the toolbox: perf kmem. To test it out, I ran a simulated connected 25-node mesh in mac80211_hwsim.

Here’s what perf kmem stat --caller had to say:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
 Callsite            | Total_alloc/Per | Total_req/Per  | Hit   | ...
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 mesh_table_alloc+3e |      1600/32    |       400/8    |    50 |
 mesh_rmc_init+23    |    204800/8192  |    102600/4104 |    25 |
 mesh_path_new.const |    315904/512   |    241864/392  |   617 |
[...]

The number of mesh nodes shows up in the ‘Hit’ column in various ways: we can pretty easily see that mesh_table_alloc is called twice per mesh device, mesh_rmc_init is called once, and mesh_path_new is called at least once for every peer (617 ~= 25 * 24). We might scan the hit column to see if there are any cases in our code that perform unexpectedly high numbers of allocations, signifying a bug or poor design.

The first two columns are also interesting because they show potentially wasteful allocations. Taking mesh_table_alloc as an example:

(gdb) l *mesh_table_alloc+0x3e
0x749fe is in mesh_table_alloc (net/mac80211/mesh_pathtbl.c:66).
61		newtbl = kmalloc(sizeof(struct mesh_table), GFP_ATOMIC);
62		if (!newtbl)
63			return NULL;
64
65		newtbl->known_gates = kzalloc(sizeof(struct hlist_head), GFP_ATOMIC);
66		if (!newtbl->known_gates) {
67			kfree(newtbl);
68			return NULL;
69		}
70		INIT_HLIST_HEAD(newtbl->known_gates);

We are allocating the size of an hlist_head, which is one pointer. This is kind of unusual: typically the list pointer is embedded directly into the structure that holds it (here, struct mesh_table). The reason this was originally done is that the table pointer itself could be switched out using RCU, and a level of indirection for the gates list ensured that the same head pointer is seen by iterators with both the old and new table. With my rhashtable rework, this indirection is no longer necessary.

To track allocations with 8-byte granularity would impose an unacceptable level of overhead, so these 8-byte allocations all get rounded up to 32 bytes (first column). Because we allocated 50 of them (25 devices, two tables each), in all we asked for 400 bytes, and actually got 1600, a waste of 1200 bytes. Forty-eight wasted bytes per device is generally nothing worth worrying about, considering we usually only have one or two devices — but as this kmalloc is no longer needed, we can just drop it and also shed a bit of error-handling code.

In the case of mesh_rmc_init, we see an opportunity for tuning. The requested allocation is the unfortunate size of 4104 bytes, just a bit larger than the page size, 4096. Allocations of a page (so-called order-0 allocations) are much easier to fulfill than the order-1 allocations that actually happen here. There are a few options here: we could remove or move the u32 in this struct that pushes it over the page size, or reduce the number of buckets in the hashtable, or switch the internal lists to hlists in order to get this to fit into 4k, and thus free up a page per device. The latter is the simplest approach, and the one I chose.

I have patches for these and a few other minor things in my local tree and will send them out soon.

On mac vi and error exits

Sometimes I have to use a Mac, and various things drive me nuts about it. The worst is git commit aborting because I typoed the writeout command after having written the best commit log ever. Here’s a google crumb for others experiencing this, and ideally for someone who wants to track down and fix the problem upstream.

Synopsis: do the below, and type the following once vim starts up: :Wq[enter]:q[enter]

$ vi || echo broken
broken
$ vim || echo broken
$ vim --version
VIM - Vi IMproved 7.4 (2010 Aug 15, compiled Jul  9 2015 23:58:42)
Compiled by root@apple.com
[...]

/usr/bin/vi is of course a symlink to /usr/bin/vim that makes it act worse. Now, there are some folks who have various theories about why vi is different in this respect, or what vimrc stuff might cause vi to exit with an error if some error happened once upon a time in the editing session, but honestly I can’t find myself caring. Instead I just set my $EDITOR to pretend vi doesn’t exist anymore.

wherein I did a git push

As I wrote somewhere in the Metaverse, I’m running the wireless-testing tree now, which is about as minimal a contribution as one could make. It essentially means running a script once daily; cron could do it all, if not for the part where I enter my ssh passphrase to actually push out the updates. For the curious, here’s the script.

One of the killer features of git used here is git rerere, which remembers conflict resolutions and reapplies them when reencountered. A human (me) still needs to resolve the conflict once, but after that it’s pretty much on autopilot for the rest of that kernel series. Normally one should reinspect the automatic merge made by git-rerere, but at least for this testing tree, throwing caution to the wind is warranted and thus the script has some kludges around that.

Every pushed tag had a successful build test with whatever (not claimed to be exhaustive) kernel config I am using locally. I’ve considered some more extensive tests here, such as running the hostapd test suite (takes an hour with 8 VMs on my hardware) or boot testing on my mesh APs (requires a giant stack of out-of-tree patches), but, given the parentheticals, I’m keeping it simple for now.

Observant persons may have noted some missing dates in the tags. Generally, this means either nothing actually changed in the trees I’m pulling, or it is during the merge window when things are too in flux to be useful. Or maybe I forgot.